PubMed

PubMed est le principal moteur de recherche de données bibliographiques en biologie et médecine, développé par le Centre américain pour les informations biotechnologiques (NCBI).

Suivre la vie du sitehttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/

Suivre la vie du sitehttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/eutils/erss.cgi?rss_g (...)

Derniers articles

  • Helping Babies Breathe (HBB) training : What happens to knowledge and skills over time ?

    29 novembre 2017, par Bang A, Patel A, Bellad R, Gisore P, Goudar SS, Esamai F, Liechty EA, Meleth S, Goco N, Niermeyer S, Keenan W, Kamath-Rayne BD, Little GA, Clarke SB, Flanagan VA, Bucher S, Jain M, Mujawar N, Jain V, Rukunga J, Mahantshetti N, Dhaded S, Bhandankar M, McClure EM, Carlo WA, Wright LL, Hibberd PL — BMC Pregnancy Childbirth
    Related Articles

    Helping Babies Breathe (HBB) training: What happens to knowledge and skills over time?

    BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2016 Nov 22;16(1):364

    Authors: Bang A, Patel A, Bellad R, Gisore P, Goudar SS, Esamai F, Liechty EA, Meleth S, Goco N, Niermeyer S, Keenan W, Kamath-Rayne BD, Little GA, Clarke SB, Flanagan VA, Bucher S, Jain M, Mujawar N, Jain V, Rukunga J, Mahantshetti N, Dhaded S, Bhandankar M, McClure EM, Carlo WA, Wright LL, Hibberd PL

    Abstract
    BACKGROUND: The first minutes after birth are critical to reducing neonatal mortality. Helping Babies Breathe (HBB) is a simulation-based neonatal resuscitation program for low resource settings. We studied the impact of initial HBB training followed by refresher training on the knowledge and skills of the birth attendants in facilities.
    METHODS: We conducted HBB trainings in 71 facilities in the NICHD Global Network research sites (Nagpur and Belgaum, India and Eldoret, Kenya), with a 6:1 ratio of facility trainees to Master Trainers (MT). Because of staff turnover, some birth attendants (BA) were trained as they joined the delivery room staff, after the initial training was completed (catch-up initial training). We compared pass rates for skills and knowledge pre- and post- initial HBB training and following refresher training among active BAs. An Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) B tested resuscitation skill retention by comparing post-initial training performance with pre-refresher training performance. We identified factors associated with loss of skills in pre-refresher training performance using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Daily bag and mask ventilation practice, equipment checks and supportive supervision were stressed as part of training.
    RESULTS: One hundred five MT (1.6 MT per facility) conducted initial and refresher HBB trainings for 835 BAs; 76% had no prior resuscitation training. Initial training improved knowledge and skills: the pass percentage for knowledge tests improved from 74 to 99% (p < 0.001). Only 5% could ventilate a newborn mannequin correctly before initial training but 97% passed the post-initial ventilation training test (p < 0.0001) and 99% passed the OSCE B resuscitation evaluation. During pre-refresher training evaluation, a mean of 6.7 (SD 2.49) months after the initial training, 99% passed the knowledge test, but the successful completion rate fell to 81% for the OSCE B resuscitation skills test. Characteristics associated with deterioration of resuscitation skills were BAs from tertiary care facilities, no prior resuscitation training, and the timing of training (initial vs. catch-up training).
    CONCLUSIONS: HBB training significantly improved neonatal resuscitation knowledge and skills. However, skills declined more than knowledge over time. Ongoing skills practice and monitoring, more frequent retesting, and refresher trainings are needed to maintain neonatal resuscitation skills.
    TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01681017 ; 04 September 2012, retrospectively registered.

    PMID: 27875999 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Google Glass for Residents Dealing With Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Arrest : A Randomized, Controlled, Simulation-Based Study.

    3 novembre 2017, par Drummond D, Arnaud C, Guedj R, Duguet A, de Suremain N, Petit A — Pediatr Crit Care Med
    Related Articles

    Google Glass for Residents Dealing With Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Arrest: A Randomized, Controlled, Simulation-Based Study.

    Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2017 Feb;18(2):120-127

    Authors: Drummond D, Arnaud C, Guedj R, Duguet A, de Suremain N, Petit A

    Abstract
    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether real-time video communication between the first responder and a remote intensivist via Google Glass improves the management of a simulated in-hospital pediatric cardiopulmonary arrest before the arrival of the ICU team.
    DESIGN: Randomized controlled study.
    SETTING: Children's hospital at a tertiary care academic medical center.
    SUBJECTS: Forty-two first-year pediatric residents.
    INTERVENTIONS: Pediatric residents were evaluated during two consecutive simulated pediatric cardiopulmonary arrests with a high-fidelity manikin. During the second evaluation, the residents in the Google Glass group were allowed to seek help from a remote intensivist at any time by activating real-time video communication. The residents in the control group were asked to provide usual care.
    MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The main outcome measures were the proportion of time for which the manikin received no ventilation (no-blow fraction) or no compression (no-flow fraction). In the first evaluation, overall no-blow and no-flow fractions were 74% and 95%, respectively. During the second evaluation, no-blow and no-flow fractions were similar between the two groups. Insufflations were more effective (p = 0.04), and the technique (p = 0.02) and rate (p < 0.001) of chest compression were more appropriate in the Google Glass group than in the control group.
    CONCLUSIONS: Real-time video communication between the first responder and a remote intensivist through Google Glass did not decrease no-blow and no-flow fractions during the first 5 minutes of a simulated pediatric cardiopulmonary arrest but improved the quality of the insufflations and chest compressions provided.

    PMID: 28165347 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Twitter @simulationsante

Copyright ABASS - Site réalisé sous SPIP par Belier HRO.